Bhargava DDS

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Map

It is important to follow the home instructions listed below to ensure the health of your mouth and the best results after your appointment. Please contact us at 316-630-0002 if you have any questions.

After Crown & Bridge Appointments

  • Please refrain from eating and drinking hot beverages until the numbness is completely worn off. Since the teeth, tongue, lips and roof of the mouth will be asleep, you can traumatize these tissues.
  • Temporary crowns can come off. Call us if this happens and bring the temporary crown with you so we can re-cement it. It is very important for the temporary to stay in place, as it will prevent other teeth from moving and compromising the fit of your final restoration.
  • Avoid eating sticky and hard foods and try to chew on the opposite side of your mouth.
  • Brush normally, but floss carefully. Pull the floss out from the side, pulling up/down on the floss may dislodge the temporary.
  • It is normal to experience temperature and pressure sensitivity during temporary wear. The sensitivity should subside a few weeks after the placement of the final restoration. Mild pain medications may also be used as directed by our office.
  • If your bite feels uneven, if you have persistent pain, or if you have any other questions or concerns, please call our office at 316-630-0002.

After Tooth Extraction

  • After tooth extraction, it’s important for a blood clot to form to stop the bleeding and begin the healing process. After the blood clot forms, it is important not to disturb or dislodge the clot as it aids in healing.
  • We will ask you to bite on a gauze pad for 5-10 minutes after the appointment while in the office. If bleeding or oozing still persists, place another gauze pad and bite firmly for another 10 minutes. You may have to do this several times.
  • Once you are home, begin rinsing with luke-warm diluted salt water 3 hours after your extraction. Do not rinse too vigorously. Allow the water to roll around and then fall out of your mouth. You cannot rinse too often, but the salt can be too strong and you can do it too powerfully.
  • Avoid sucking on straws, drinking carbonated beverages, smoking, drinking alcohol or brushing the teeth next to the extraction site for 24 hours. These activities will dislodge or dissolve the clot and delay the healing process.
  • Limit vigorous exercise for the next 24 hours as this will increase blood flow and cause bleeding from the extraction site.
  • Use an ice pack or an unopened bag of frozen peas or corn to reduce discomfort and swelling. Swelling usually subsides after 48 hours. The ice packs should be applied 15 minutes on and then15 minutes off for maximum benefit.
  • Use the pain medication as directed. Call the office if the medication doesn't seem to be working. If antibiotics are prescribed, continue to take them for the indicated length of time, even if signs and symptoms of infection are gone.
  • Drink lots of fluid and eat nutritious soft food on the day of the extraction. You can eat normally as soon as you are comfortable. However you will need avoid these food items until the tissue has healed completely:
  1. Nuts and seeds
  2. Food items with hulls
  3. Spicy, sour and hot foods
  4. Chips
  5. Raw vegetables
  • It is important to resume your normal dental routine after 24 hours. This should include brushing and flossing your teeth at least once a day. This will speed healing and help keep your mouth fresh and clean.
  • If you have heavy bleeding, severe pain, continued swelling for 2-3 days, or a reaction to the medication, call our office immediately at 316-630-0002.

After Fillings (White Fillings)

  • Your lips and tongue may be numb for several hours after the appointment. Avoid any chewing and hot beverages until the numbness has completely worn off. It is very easy to bite or burn your tongue or lip while you are numb.
  • The injection sites may be sore. Ibuprofen (Motrin) or Tylenol (use as directed) work well to alleviate the tenderness.
  • If pressure sensitivity persists beyond a few days or if sensitivity to hot or cold increases, contact our office.
  • It is normal to experience temperature & pressure sensitivity after a filling is placed.
  • You may chew with your composite fillings as soon as the anesthetic completely wears off, since they are fully set when you leave the office.
  • If it is uncomfortable when you chew, or if you can squeeze your teeth together and cause discomfort after one week, call our office for a bite adjustment appointment.
  • If your bite feels uneven, if you have persistent pain, or if you have any other questions or concerns, please call our office at 316-630-0002.
Temperature:
  • It is normal to run a low grade temperature (99-100F) for 7-10 days following oral surgery (extractions). This reflects your immune response to the normal bacteria that are present in your mouth. A high temperature (>101F) might exist for 6-8 hours after surgery but no more than that.
  • 2 Tylenol or 2-4 Ibuprofen (use as directed) every 4-6 hours will help to moderate a temperature.
  • A temperature of 101F several days after surgery, especially if accompanied by rock hard swelling and increased pain, is usually indicative of infection. You should call the office for instructions if this should occur.
Pain:
  • Pain or discomfort following surgery is expected to last 4-5 days. For many patients, it seems the third and fourth day may require more pain medicine than the first and second day. Following the fourth day pain should subside more and more every day.
  • Many medications for pain can cause nausea or vomiting. It is wise to have something of substance in the stomach (yogurt, ice cream, pudding or apple sauce) before taking prescription pain medicines and/or over the counter pain medicines (especially aspirin or ibuprofen). Even coating the stomach with Pepto Bismol or Milk of Magnesia can help prevent moderate nausea.
  • For moderate pain, one or two tablets of Tylenol or Extra Strength Tylenol may be taken every three to four hours or Ibuprofen (Motrin or Advil) two-four 200 mg tablets may be taken every 3-4 hours.
  • For severe pain take the tablets prescribed for pain as directed. The prescribed pain medicine will make you groggy and will slow down your reflexes.
    1. Do not drive an automobile or work around or operate heavy machinery if you are taking prescription pain medicine such as narcotics like Tylenol 3 or Norco.
    2. Alcohol and prescription pain medicines do not mix!
Antibiotics:
  • If you have been placed on antibiotics take the tablets or liquid as directed. You should take them on schedule until they are completely gone.
  • Discontinue antibiotic use in the event of a rash or other unfavorable reaction. You should call the office (316-630-0002) to report any such finding or if you have any questions.
Diet:
  • Drink plenty of fluids. Try to drink 5-6 eight ounce glasses the first day.
  • Drink from a glass or cup and don’t use a straw. The sucking motion will suck out the healing blood clot and cause bleeding again.
  • Avoid hot liquids or food while you are numb so you don’t burn yourself.
  • Soft food and liquids can be eaten on the day of surgery. The act of chewing doesn't damage anything, but you should avoid chewing sharp or hard objects at the surgical site for several days.
  • Return to a normal diet as soon as possible unless otherwise directed. You will find eating multiple small meals is easier than three regular meals for the first few days.
  • You will feel better, have more strength, less discomfort and heal faster if you continue to eat.
Oral Hygiene:
  • Good oral hygiene is essential to proper healing of any oral surgery site.
  • You can brush your teeth the night of surgery but rinse very gently. Vigorous rinsing should be avoided until two weeks following surgery.
  • The day after surgery you should begin rinsing at least 5-6 times a day especially after eating. Salt water (cup of warm water mixed with a teaspoon of salt) is ideal.
  • Avoid mouthwashes containing alcohol for it can overly dry the surgical site causing discomfort.
Smoking:
  • No smoking for 24-48 hours after surgery. Smoking decreases healing dramatically. Nicotine constricts blood vessels which slows the formation and expansion of the healing blood clot in the socket. This leads to the painful complication called a "Dry Socket".

After Root Canal Therapy

  • Anesthetic will be used for your root canal procedure. Your lips, teeth and tongue may be numb for several hours after the appointment. Avoid any chewing until the numbness has completely worn off.
  • Depending on your individual circumstance, there may be two or more appointments to complete your root canal therapy and the final restoration for support. If a small portion of your temporary filling wears away or falls out, or if a temporary crown comes off, call us so that it can be replaced.
  • It's normal to experience some discomfort for several days after a root canal appointment, especially when chewing. To control discomfort, take pain medication as recommended. To further reduce pain and swelling, rinse three times a day with warm salt water (a tsp. of salt in a cup of warm water, rinse-swish-spit).
  • If antibiotics are prescribed, continue to take them even if all symptoms and signs of infection are gone.
  • To protect the tooth and help keep you temporary in place, avoid eating sticky foods (especially gum), hard foods, and if possible, chew only on the opposite side of your mouth.
  • It's important to continue to brush and floss normally. However, pull the floss out of the side instead of popping it back through the contact. This tension can cause the temporary to dislodge.
  • If your bite feels uneven, if you have persistent swelling or pain, or you have any other questions or concerns, please call our office.

After Periodontal Surgery

  • After your periodontal surgery, your lips, teeth and tongue may be numb for several hours. Avoid any chewing until the numbness has completely worn off. Don't eat anything for two hours following surgery.
  • It's normal to experience some discomfort for several days after a surgery. To control discomfort, take pain medication as recommended. Do not take medication on an empty stomach or nausea may result. Apply an ice pack (20 minutes on, 20 minutes off) for six hours following surgery to decrease pain and swelling.
  • After twenty-four hours, to further reduce pain and swelling, rinse three times a day with warm salt water (put a tsp. of salt in a cup of warm water, gently rinse-swish-spit). If antibiotics are prescribed, continue to take them for the indicated length of time, even if all symptoms and signs of infection are gone.
  • Some slight bleeding is normal for a day or so following surgery. If bleeding persists, apply firm pressure with a moist gauze pad or bite on a tea bag for twenty minutes. Elevate your head with pillows. Call our office if this doesn't control bleeding or if bleeding increases.
  • For the first 48 hours, restrict your diet to soft foods such as yogurt, ice cream, cottage cheese, and soups until you can chew comfortably. Relax as much as possible and avoid all strenuous activities for the first twenty-four hours following surgery.
  • Continue your normal homecare routine in the non-treated areas. You may gently rinse around the treated area with warm water, but frequent or vigorous rinsing must be avoided until healing has taken place. Call us if pain or swelling persists or if you have any questions or concerns.

Dental Rehabilitation: Multiple Crowns at the Same Time

  • It will take time to adjust to the feel of your new teeth. When the bite or position of the teeth is altered it takes several days for the brain to recognize the new position and thickness as normal. If you detect any high spots or problems with your bite, call our office so we can schedule an adjustment appointment.
  • Other signs the bite might be wrong:
  1. Sensitivity that begins after eating or when you wake that subsides as time passes
  2. A zing through the tooth when you bite on something or squeeze your teeth together
  3. Cold/Hot sensitivity that increases as time passes
  • It is normal to experience some hot and cold sensitivity after removal of tooth structure so your teeth may be sensitive for a week or so. Your gums may also be sore and require good hygiene during the healing process. Warm salt water rinses (just enough salt to tastes, it does not need to be strong) throughout the day will reduce discomfort and swelling.  A mild pain medication (one tablet of Tylenol or Ibuprofen (Motrin) every 3-4 hours) should ease any residual discomfort.
  • Don’t be concerned if your speech is affected for the first few days. You'll quickly adapt and begin speaking normally. You may notice increased salivation. This is because your brain is responding to the new size and shape of your teeth. This should subside to normal in about a week.
  • Daily brushing and flossing is a must. The healthier your gums are when we see you for your seat appointment, the easier it will be. Use a Waterpik with half peroxide, half water and ONE DROP of antibacterial soap to clean the gums around your temporaries. You will be unable to floss between the teeth during your temporary wear. Once your final restorations are placed you will be able to care for them as you did before your new smile.
  • Any food that can crack, chip or damage a natural tooth can do the same to your new teeth. Avoid hard foods and substances (such as beer nuts, peanut brittle, ice, fingernails, or pencils) and sticky candies. Minimize or avoid foods that stain such as coffee, red wine, tea and berries. Tobacco use will also cause your new teeth to stain.
  • Adjusting to the look and feel of your new smile will take time. If you have any problems or concerns, please let us know. We always welcome your questions.

Dental Rehabilitation: After Final Restorations

  • If you detect any high spots or problems with your bite, call our office so we can schedule an adjustment appointment.
  • Other signs the bite might be wrong:
  1. Sensitivity that begins after eating or when you wake that subsides as time passes
  2. A zing through the tooth when you bite on something or squeeze your teeth together
  3. Cold/Hot sensitivity that increases as time passes
  4. Continue to rinse with the warm saltwater until all tissue is healed and feeling normal. Floss and brush two times a day. Plaque removal is critical for the long-term success of your new smile, as are your regular hygiene appointments. Decay can begin where the tooth and porcelain restorations meet. The only way to avoid this process is to make sure all plague, tarter and food particles are removed on a daily basis.
  • Continue to avoid foods and materials that can damage your new smile. This includes:
    • Biting fingernails
    • String and thread
    • Opening packets with your teeth
    • Ice
    • Hard candies
    • Remember: Your teeth are jewels, NOT TOOLS!
  • If you clench or grind your teeth, wear a night guard if we have provided one.

Night Guard Home Instructions

  • When cleaning your night guard, use only cool water. Hot water can distort the shape rendering it unusable. Brush your appliance each morning with soap, not toothpaste. Toothpaste can cause microscopic scratches trapping odor causing bacteria to become trapped in your appliance.
  • You should hit evenly where your teeth come into contact with the night guard. If your bite becomes uneven or divots are worn into the biting surface of the night guard, call us to schedule an adjustment appointment.
  • After removing your night guard in the mornings, you might notice that your teeth do not fit together right. This means that your muscles have "lost memory" and need a few minutes to remember. Tap your teeth together a few times and it should go back to normal.
  • Occasionally, your teeth will not fit back together as they did before wearing the night guard. If this occurs it will be necessary to evaluate your teeth to even out your bite.
  • Over time you will wear the night guard down. The amount of wear solely depends on each person and how severely they clench and grind their teeth. Replacement of night guards is required throughout your lifetime; imagine the wear you are avoiding on your teeth.

After Partial and Full Dentures

  • New dentures always require a period of adjustment. First-time denture patients may require several weeks to get used to their new appliance.
  • Speech may be altered, and may require an adjustment period for the tongue and lips to get used to the appliance.
  • For the first few days, you should wear your dentures for as long as possible, and chew soft food in small bites. Remember, dentures do not have the same chewing efficiency as natural teeth and may affect your taste of food.
  • If your bite feels uneven after several days, please give us a call so we can schedule a bite adjustment patient.
  • It is not unusual for sore spots to develop in isolated areas of the mouth. These areas can be relieved easily with an adjustment appointment. If a severe sore spot develops which prevents wearing the please call our office so we can get you in quickly. Please wear the denture for 24 hours prior to the appointment. This will greatly aid in locating the exact location of the area, and make adjustments significantly easier and more predictable. If we cannot see where the denture is bothering you, then we will not be able to adjust it accurately.
  • Proper cleaning of your denture is important to prevent stains and bacteria from accumulating. Brush daily with soap and water. You can also purchase over the counter denture soak to help dissolve hard deposits. Bring your denture with you to all follow up and hygiene appointments so we can thoroughly clean it for you.
  • Oral Cancer Evaluations are still necessary even if there are not teeth to be cleaned. Continue to visit your dental hygienists for oral cancer exams.
  • Do not wear your complete or partial dentures to bed unless instructed to do so. It is important to allow your gum tissues and jaw bones to rest in order to prevent further tissue irritation, infection, and future bone shrinkage.
  • Over time, or with weight loss or gain, the supporting gum tissues and bone may change shape and size. Periodic relines of your dentures may be necessary to ensure a retentive fit. Denture teeth may wear or chip over time. For this reason, an annual check of your tissues and dentures is recommended.

Teeth Whitening Instructions

  • Keep your whitening gel in the refrigerator. This will make it a little easier to manipulate and will extend the shelf life of the gel.
  • Before starting, floss and brush thoroughly. If you bleed when flossing, wait until this subsides before beginning whitening. The best time to whiten is just after your regular dental cleaning when all tartar has been removed.
  • Please follow the written instructions that come with your specific whitening product. These are general guidelines.
  • Place a VERY SMALL pea size or smaller amount of whitening gel in each tooth slot on the cheek side of your custom whitening tray. It is best to place it towards the top of the slot to allow the gel to disperse evenly downward.
  • Place tray and rub the front of your teeth to spread whitening gel.
    NOTE: if whitening gel comes in contact with your gum tissue, remove tray and rinse mouth. This means that there is too much gel in the tray. Apply less gel at next application.
  • Allow trays to stay in place for one hour or follow printed instructions. Do not drink or eat during this time.
  • Remove trays, rinse and brush them with cool water. Using hot water may distort trays making them less effective.
  • Rinse mouth with warm water and brush teeth thoroughly.
  • Repeat these steps every day for up to two weeks to enjoy your new bright smile. 
  • You can repeat whitening again in about 4-6 months.
  • You will find out for yourself where your sensitivity level is.